Saturday, 25 February 2017
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Arizona Senate Approves Bill To Curb Violent Protests

Added: 25.02.2017 6:12 | 0 views | 0 comments


Under the measure, participating in or helping organize a demonstration that turns into a riot will be seen as an offense.

From: https:

Why does the capture of Syria's Al-Bab matter?

Added: 25.02.2017 5:12 | 0 views | 0 comments


The Syrian town of Al-Bab was for three years a key jihadist stronghold in northern Syria, whose capture Ankara hopes will give Turkey greater influence over the postwar shape of the country. The town, whose name means "The Gate", had an estimated prewar population of some 100,000 but was the target of an over three-month assault by Turkey and allied rebel forces which met with fierce resistance. On Thursday, pro-Ankara rebels said they had fully captured the city while Turkey said near complete control had been imposed, with lingering jihadists still needing to be flushed out.

Georgia woman wages single-handed fight for open government

Added: 25.02.2017 5:12 | 0 views | 0 comments


ATLANTA (AP) — When Nydia Tisdale turned her camera on a north Georgia city council meeting, the mayor ordered her to stop recording and had a police officer forcibly remove her and the camera.

Comey faces pressure as White House fights Russia reports

Added: 25.02.2017 5:12 | 0 views | 0 comments


WASHINGTON (AP) — FBI Director James Comey is again in a familiar spot these days — the middle of political tumult.

Trove of Dazzling Bronze Age Weapons Unearthed in Scotland

Added: 25.02.2017 5:12 | 0 views | 0 comments


Excavations during the construction of two soccer fields in Scotland have turned up a rare discovery — a Bronze-Age weapon hoard, including a notched bronze sword and a gold-decorated spearhead. All told, archaeologists discovered the remains of 12 Bronze Age buildings during the dig, as well as a much earlier Stone Age hall that probably dates back to the very beginnings of agriculture in Scotland. "There was no real indication of the wealth of archaeological remains" before the dig, said Ronan Toolis, the commercial director of GUARD Archaeology Limited, the firm that conducted the excavation.

Video of 'chubby' tigers taking down a drone may be way darker than you think

Added: 25.02.2017 4:13 | 0 views | 0 comments


A video of "chubby" Siberian tigers taking down a drone, complete with a silly soundtrack — like so much viral content — is more than what it seems.  While the video's been shared far and wide, but the origins of the footage have been a cause for concern for a while now.  SEE ALSO: Watch a bunch of chubby tigers take down a drone and try to eat it As science journalist John R. Platt tweeted, the footage is "obviously a tiger farm."  Reminder: China has an estimated *7* wild tigers left. Many this video = obviously a tiger farm. They'll be turned into bone & wine https://t.co/7hxmkSDei2 — John R Platt (@johnrplatt) February 23, 2017 While the name of the park isn't mentioned in the description of the videos (as to avoid searching of the park's record according to Platt,) the location is.  Heilongjiang Province in China is the home of Harbin Siberian Tiger Park. It's one of the two biggest tiger-breeding facilities in the country, according to a 2013 report on the country's clandestine tiger trade by the Environmental Investigation Agency. The park is advertised as a tourist attraction, where visitors can offer meat and even live animals, to the tigers. As per a report by McClatchy, the number of visitors doesn't cover the cost of feeding or breeding hundreds of tigers each year. The real money comes from the sale of tiger pelts, tiger bone wine, and other products that have been banned in China. McClatchy visited Harbin Siberian Tiger Park, and reported bottles of tiger bone wine on display — albeit not advertised as tiger bone wine, but some had images of tigers on the packaging. Some of these "bone strengthening wines" advertise the use of tiger bone in its manufacture to distinguish itself from other wines in its category, according to the Environmental Investigation Agency's report. The same park was under scrutiny after conservation groups were outraged at images of obese tigers, thought to be seriously ill. Last word on tiger-drone video: Chinese media often share cute tiger videos. They're all propaganda to hide the reality of tiger farms. — John R Platt (@johnrplatt) February 24, 2017 Since 1993, there has been a ban on the trade of tiger bones, but the state has encouraged the growth of tiger farms. In 2007, India and the UK called on China to ban tiger farms due to concerns over the impact it had on the wild population.  [h/t Motherboard] BONUS: This organization is providing kids with 3D-printed prosthetics — free of charge

Understanding which wireless network is actually the best

Added: 25.02.2017 4:13 | 0 views | 0 comments


Every year, a bunch of different studies come out that crown a winner, the "best network" in the USA. Each study claims to use the best, most scientific methodology to give "unrivaled accuracy" or "undisputed results," or something else equally quotable.
But if the studies are so good, why do they give such different results? Take a study , which has Verizon in first place and T-Mobile in last. That's in stark contrast to a , which had T-Mobile and Verizon tied for first and Sprint languishing in last place.
The reason for the difference is that measuring cellphone networks is hard. We're talking about trying to quantify a network that stretches across the entire country, works on tens of thousands of different devices and in all kinds of terrain. Trying to measure that, assign each of the big four wireless networks an easy-to-understand score and publish results in a 300-word blog post is basically impossible.

RootMetrics and OpenSignal are two good examples of the most common approach to actually measuring network signal and speed (as opposed to something like Nielsen, which surveys users for their perception of their network). RootMetrics buys devices and sends testers out to set locations, where they test all the networks head-to-head and record the results.
It's known in the industry as drive-testing, and has some major advantages: it pits the networks head-to-head, it's repeatable, and by controlling the number of tests, the location, and the testing device, you remove most of the variability in the testing.
OpenSignal takes a completely different approach. Rather than sending employees out with test devices, it encourages users to download an app. Users then conduct speed tests and coverage tests as they go about their day-to-day lives, and the data is uploaded to OpenSignal.
Compared to drive-testing, it's less repeatable and less "scientific." But it also has the advantage of sheer numbers: hundreds of thousands of OpenSignal users submitted billions of data points for their last test. That means OpenSignal is more likely to be representative of day-to-day performance of a network, as it's measuring the actual day-to-day performance of users -- not a statistical representation of the average day.
Yes, there are flaws in OpenSignal's methodology too. Users are more likely to be on a network that works in their area, so you're less likely to get data from areas that have no coverage. If a small town somewhere only gets Verizon signal, then everyone in that town is going to be on Verizon, and you're not going to get a bunch of tests that show no signal for T-Mobile.
There's also questions about demographics: wealthier people with nicer smartphones are more likely to be on expensive networks like Verizon and AT&T, which means more Sprint and T-Mobile users would be on older smartphones, which in turn are slower than newer devices on the same network.
The end result is that no one method is perfect, and it's important to look at a range of results rather than just one test. For the majority of users, I tend to suspect that crowd-sourced testing like OpenSignal will be more representative, but without seeing the precise data set and methodology of all the studies (for example, the RootScores that RootMetrics provides are calculated ) it's difficult to make a call one way or the other.
There is one thing that prospective customers can check, though: local coverage maps. Quantifying a cell network across a country is hard, but getting data on coverage on a particular street is comparatively easy. OpenSignal excels at this, thanks to the crowd-sourced data, and its coverage map should be the first thing you check when you're thinking about switching networks.

Historic Oscar moment you shouldn't miss

Added: 25.02.2017 3:53 | 0 views | 0 comments

One of the best moments during the 89th Academy Awards may fly under the radar for the millions of viewers expected to tune into the Oscar telecast Sunday night -- which is a shame.

New method reveals how proteins stabilize the cell surface

Added: 25.02.2017 3:14 | 0 views | 0 comments

To withstand external mechanical stress and handle trafficking of various substances, a cell needs to adjust its surrounding membrane. This is done through small indentations on the cell surface called caveolae. In order to stabilize its membrane, cells use the protein EHD2, which can be turned on and off to alternate between an inactive closed form and an active open form, scientists have discovered.

From: feeds.sciencedaily.com

New Technology Empowers You To Fight Crime With Your Smartphone Camera

Added: 25.02.2017 2:28 | 0 views | 0 comments

This new technology is empowering everyday people to turn everyday behaviors into heroic efforts.

From: www.forbes.com

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