Saturday, 25 February 2017
News with tag Goods  RSS
Google Cracked SHA-1 Encryption: What Does It Mean?

Added: 25.02.2017 4:13 | 0 views | 0 comments


Google has cracked the code for the the SHA-1 algorithm, which is a crucial aspect of the internet's security. This likely means SHA-1's encryption usefulness has come to an end.

Tesla now offers insurance and maintenance for life

Added: 25.02.2017 4:13 | 0 views | 0 comments


Self-driving cars are going to ruin everything--in a good way. If all goes as planned, they'll dramatically reduce auto accidents and highway fatalities; boost fuel efficiency; minimize traffic jams; and maybe even cut the number of vehicles we own. Autonomous vehicles are likely to wreak havoc on the insurance industry, too. For insurance agents who might not be worried about that doomsday scenario just yet, they should take a look at Tesla. That's because Tesla has slowly begun offering lifetime insurance policies to some buyers--and that package covers vehicle maintenance, too. The automaker hasn't widely discussed the feature, but it became public knowledge during an earnings call earlier this week. According to Tesla's President of Global Sales and Service, Jonathan McNeill, the insurance and maintenance package has been quietly rolling out to shoppers in Asian markets, where it's proven very popular. In fact, McNeill says that the majority of Tesla buyers in Asia have opted to shell out for the package. Tesla hasn't yet confirmed the price of the package, nor has it hinted when it might be available to shoppers in other markets. However, the offering clearly stems in large part from the company's confidence in its semi-autonomous (and soon, fully autonomous) Autopilot software.  Would you be willing to pay upfront for a lifetime insurance and maintenance package? If so, how much? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

Understanding which wireless network is actually the best

Added: 25.02.2017 4:13 | 0 views | 0 comments


Every year, a bunch of different studies come out that crown a winner, the "best network" in the USA. Each study claims to use the best, most scientific methodology to give "unrivaled accuracy" or "undisputed results," or something else equally quotable.
But if the studies are so good, why do they give such different results? Take a study , which has Verizon in first place and T-Mobile in last. That's in stark contrast to a , which had T-Mobile and Verizon tied for first and Sprint languishing in last place.
The reason for the difference is that measuring cellphone networks is hard. We're talking about trying to quantify a network that stretches across the entire country, works on tens of thousands of different devices and in all kinds of terrain. Trying to measure that, assign each of the big four wireless networks an easy-to-understand score and publish results in a 300-word blog post is basically impossible.

RootMetrics and OpenSignal are two good examples of the most common approach to actually measuring network signal and speed (as opposed to something like Nielsen, which surveys users for their perception of their network). RootMetrics buys devices and sends testers out to set locations, where they test all the networks head-to-head and record the results.
It's known in the industry as drive-testing, and has some major advantages: it pits the networks head-to-head, it's repeatable, and by controlling the number of tests, the location, and the testing device, you remove most of the variability in the testing.
OpenSignal takes a completely different approach. Rather than sending employees out with test devices, it encourages users to download an app. Users then conduct speed tests and coverage tests as they go about their day-to-day lives, and the data is uploaded to OpenSignal.
Compared to drive-testing, it's less repeatable and less "scientific." But it also has the advantage of sheer numbers: hundreds of thousands of OpenSignal users submitted billions of data points for their last test. That means OpenSignal is more likely to be representative of day-to-day performance of a network, as it's measuring the actual day-to-day performance of users -- not a statistical representation of the average day.
Yes, there are flaws in OpenSignal's methodology too. Users are more likely to be on a network that works in their area, so you're less likely to get data from areas that have no coverage. If a small town somewhere only gets Verizon signal, then everyone in that town is going to be on Verizon, and you're not going to get a bunch of tests that show no signal for T-Mobile.
There's also questions about demographics: wealthier people with nicer smartphones are more likely to be on expensive networks like Verizon and AT&T, which means more Sprint and T-Mobile users would be on older smartphones, which in turn are slower than newer devices on the same network.
The end result is that no one method is perfect, and it's important to look at a range of results rather than just one test. For the majority of users, I tend to suspect that crowd-sourced testing like OpenSignal will be more representative, but without seeing the precise data set and methodology of all the studies (for example, the RootScores that RootMetrics provides are calculated ) it's difficult to make a call one way or the other.
There is one thing that prospective customers can check, though: local coverage maps. Quantifying a cell network across a country is hard, but getting data on coverage on a particular street is comparatively easy. OpenSignal excels at this, thanks to the crowd-sourced data, and its coverage map should be the first thing you check when you're thinking about switching networks.

Uber, 1Password, Fitbit and OKCupid user data exposed by massive security flaw

Added: 25.02.2017 4:13 | 0 views | 0 comments


The good news is that hackers do not appear to have taken advantage of a severe Cloudflare security bug that would have given them access to sensitive customer data including passwords and authentication tokens. The bad news is that the bug was only recently discovered, which means it went undetected for nearly five months.
Cloudflare is a content delivery serviced used by more than 5.5 million sites, including plenty of popular ones that you might use on a regular basis such as Uber, 1Password, Fitbit and OKCupid. In other words, it's probably a good idea to change your passwords immediately.
The bug was initially discovered by Google’s Project Zero security researcher Tavis Ormandy, . He then Cloudflare once he realized what he discovered, comparing it to Heartbleed in scope and severity. The company promptly fixed the issue.
"The bug was serious because the leaked memory could contain private information and because it had been cached by search engines," Cloudflare CTO John Graham-Cumming wrote in a  on the company blog. "We are disclosing this problem now as we are satisfied that search engine caches have now been cleared of sensitive information. We have also not discovered any evidence of malicious exploits of the bug or other reports of its existence."
The security bug could have exposed plenty of user data, including passwords, cookies, tokens used to authenticate users, and even Cloudflare’s encryption keys used to protect server-to-server traffic. And all that data was then cached by search engines including Google, Yahoo, and Bing, which would have given hackers nearly live access to the data.
Even though Cloudflare acknowledged the issue, Ormandy took issue with the company’s disclosure. "It contains an excellent postmortem, but severely downplays the risk to customers," he wrote in an update. He was also the one to mention the names of the companies that may have been affected by security breaches in a Twitter message.
https://twitter.com/taviso/status/834900838837411840
1Password said in a that thanks to its triple encryption layer, no sensitive data was ever exposed to hackers.

Apple Preparing to Open 'Spaceship' Headquarters in April

Added: 25.02.2017 1:45 | 0 views | 0 comments

DAILY VIDEO: Apple's futuristic new HQ Set to open doors in April; UPS tests delivery trucks equipped with drones as efficiency booster; GPU support becomes available for Google Cloud customers; and there's more.

From: www.eweek.com

The good and the bad: Mass Effect Andromeda first hands-on impressions | Finder

Added: 25.02.2017 1:12 | 0 views | 0 comments

Its one of the years most hotly anticipated games and weve got some first hands-on impressions of Mass Effect Andromeda to share.

See how Horizon: Zero Dawn looks like in 4K with this high quality video

Added: 25.02.2017 1:12 | 0 views | 0 comments

Digital Foundry's subscription service for high quality 4K videos has just uploaded a FREE video for Horizon: Zero Dawn. These are high quality files that you have to download to watch. Either by copying it to a USB and connect to a 4K TV. Or by watching on a PC with a 4K monitor. If not you could watch the embedded video. But be warned it is compressed by YouTube and not showing how good it really does look. Enjoy! :)

2017 Fantasy Baseball Draft Prep: All-H2H and All-Roto teams highlight differences between formats with players like Carlos Santana, Starling Marte

Added: 25.02.2017 1:10 | 5 views | 0 comments

Good players are good and bad players are bad, but some players excel one format than another. Scott White highlights several of those players.

From: www.cbssports.com

Google’s Pixel XL works much better on Verizon than T-Mobile for one weird reason

Added: 24.02.2017 23:18 | 0 views | 0 comments


It's 2017, which means we're long past the days when your phone should lock you in to one particular carrier. Unfortunately, Google doesn't seem to agree.
A  Cellular Insights takes a deep dive into how the Google Pixel XL performs on different networks. According to their testing, 3x Carrier Aggregation -- a feature that combines different LTE bands for blazing-fast speeds -- doesn't work on T-Mobile, but does on Verizon.

The end result will be slower speeds for T-Mobile users compared to Verizon, even if the two networks are totally equal in one place. It's a handicap for T-Mobile, as most customers won't know that it's the phone causing the slowdown.
The reason for the lack of 3xCA on T-Mobile appears to be software related. 3xCA works just fine on Verizon, and Google advertises 3xCA as a feature for the Pixel XL. Cellular Insights explains the problem:
"Despite the device being fully unlocked and (at least initially) marketed in North America as Cat 9 capable, Google exercises the right to enable and disable not only LTE bands and CA combos on “per operator” basis, but capabilities and features as well, such as LTE Category and Higher Order Modulation. We simply can not rationalize the reason behind this decision, but it is hard to imagine that this was an accident, knowing that T-Mobile is one of the very first U.S. operators to rollout 3xCA, as well as one of the first operators globally to activate DL-256QAM, UL-64QAM, EVS, etc. We are hoping that one of the upcoming Google OTA updates will take care of T-Mobile specific carrier profile, allowing the Pixel XL to take the full advantage of the network."
With your tinfoil hat on, there's one obvious explanation for this behaviour: Verizon is the exclusive carrier retail partner for the Pixel and Pixel XL in the States. If you want a Pixel on T-Mobile, you'll have to buy it outright unlocked from Google and get your own T-Mobile SIM. Hypothetically, there might be some agreement between Verizon and Google to only enable certain network features on Verizon, giving the network a sly upper hand.
Google did not immediately return a request for comment.

Perfect Your Stace Face With Alice + Olivia's New Eyewear Collection

Added: 24.02.2017 22:36 | 0 views | 0 comments

Alice + Olivia designer and founder Stacey Bendet has finally brought her quirky style to eyewear, and the results are over-the-top good.

From: www.forbes.com

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