Saturday, 25 February 2017
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Save Up to 95% OFF February BLOWOUT SALE - $0.00

Added: 25.02.2017 5:54 | 0 views | 0 comments

Newegg offers FEBRUARY BLOWOUT SALE! Up to 95% OFF on Select Items. ...

From: www.dealepic.com

Guatemalan navy blocks Dutch 'abortion ship'

Added: 25.02.2017 4:13 | 0 views | 0 comments


Guatemala's military detains a Dutch boat that provides abortions as it entered the waters outside the Central American country. Abortion is illegal in Guatemala, unless the woman's live is at risk. Eve Johnson reports.

Understanding which wireless network is actually the best

Added: 25.02.2017 4:13 | 0 views | 0 comments


Every year, a bunch of different studies come out that crown a winner, the "best network" in the USA. Each study claims to use the best, most scientific methodology to give "unrivaled accuracy" or "undisputed results," or something else equally quotable.
But if the studies are so good, why do they give such different results? Take a study , which has Verizon in first place and T-Mobile in last. That's in stark contrast to a , which had T-Mobile and Verizon tied for first and Sprint languishing in last place.
The reason for the difference is that measuring cellphone networks is hard. We're talking about trying to quantify a network that stretches across the entire country, works on tens of thousands of different devices and in all kinds of terrain. Trying to measure that, assign each of the big four wireless networks an easy-to-understand score and publish results in a 300-word blog post is basically impossible.

RootMetrics and OpenSignal are two good examples of the most common approach to actually measuring network signal and speed (as opposed to something like Nielsen, which surveys users for their perception of their network). RootMetrics buys devices and sends testers out to set locations, where they test all the networks head-to-head and record the results.
It's known in the industry as drive-testing, and has some major advantages: it pits the networks head-to-head, it's repeatable, and by controlling the number of tests, the location, and the testing device, you remove most of the variability in the testing.
OpenSignal takes a completely different approach. Rather than sending employees out with test devices, it encourages users to download an app. Users then conduct speed tests and coverage tests as they go about their day-to-day lives, and the data is uploaded to OpenSignal.
Compared to drive-testing, it's less repeatable and less "scientific." But it also has the advantage of sheer numbers: hundreds of thousands of OpenSignal users submitted billions of data points for their last test. That means OpenSignal is more likely to be representative of day-to-day performance of a network, as it's measuring the actual day-to-day performance of users -- not a statistical representation of the average day.
Yes, there are flaws in OpenSignal's methodology too. Users are more likely to be on a network that works in their area, so you're less likely to get data from areas that have no coverage. If a small town somewhere only gets Verizon signal, then everyone in that town is going to be on Verizon, and you're not going to get a bunch of tests that show no signal for T-Mobile.
There's also questions about demographics: wealthier people with nicer smartphones are more likely to be on expensive networks like Verizon and AT&T, which means more Sprint and T-Mobile users would be on older smartphones, which in turn are slower than newer devices on the same network.
The end result is that no one method is perfect, and it's important to look at a range of results rather than just one test. For the majority of users, I tend to suspect that crowd-sourced testing like OpenSignal will be more representative, but without seeing the precise data set and methodology of all the studies (for example, the RootScores that RootMetrics provides are calculated ) it's difficult to make a call one way or the other.
There is one thing that prospective customers can check, though: local coverage maps. Quantifying a cell network across a country is hard, but getting data on coverage on a particular street is comparatively easy. OpenSignal excels at this, thanks to the crowd-sourced data, and its coverage map should be the first thing you check when you're thinking about switching networks.

Uber, 1Password, Fitbit and OKCupid user data exposed by massive security flaw

Added: 25.02.2017 4:13 | 0 views | 0 comments


The good news is that hackers do not appear to have taken advantage of a severe Cloudflare security bug that would have given them access to sensitive customer data including passwords and authentication tokens. The bad news is that the bug was only recently discovered, which means it went undetected for nearly five months.
Cloudflare is a content delivery serviced used by more than 5.5 million sites, including plenty of popular ones that you might use on a regular basis such as Uber, 1Password, Fitbit and OKCupid. In other words, it's probably a good idea to change your passwords immediately.
The bug was initially discovered by Google’s Project Zero security researcher Tavis Ormandy, . He then Cloudflare once he realized what he discovered, comparing it to Heartbleed in scope and severity. The company promptly fixed the issue.
"The bug was serious because the leaked memory could contain private information and because it had been cached by search engines," Cloudflare CTO John Graham-Cumming wrote in a  on the company blog. "We are disclosing this problem now as we are satisfied that search engine caches have now been cleared of sensitive information. We have also not discovered any evidence of malicious exploits of the bug or other reports of its existence."
The security bug could have exposed plenty of user data, including passwords, cookies, tokens used to authenticate users, and even Cloudflare’s encryption keys used to protect server-to-server traffic. And all that data was then cached by search engines including Google, Yahoo, and Bing, which would have given hackers nearly live access to the data.
Even though Cloudflare acknowledged the issue, Ormandy took issue with the company’s disclosure. "It contains an excellent postmortem, but severely downplays the risk to customers," he wrote in an update. He was also the one to mention the names of the companies that may have been affected by security breaches in a Twitter message.
https://twitter.com/taviso/status/834900838837411840
1Password said in a that thanks to its triple encryption layer, no sensitive data was ever exposed to hackers.

Court blocks bail hearings for immigrant teens

Added: 25.02.2017 3:11 | 1 views | 0 comments

Lawyers for the children said it was unfair that minors were not entitled to the same immigration court hearings routinely given to adults.

From: www.politico.com

Trump Rejects Intelligence Report on Travel Ban

Added: 25.02.2017 2:03 | 0 views | 0 comments

An intelligence report by the Department of Homeland Security contradicts the White House’s assertion that immigrants from seven Muslim-majority countries pose a particular risk of being terrorists and should be blocked from entering the U.S.

Unmasked: 15 Times Spider-Man’s Identity Was Revealed

Added: 25.02.2017 2:00 | 1 views | 0 comments

Unmasked: 15 Times Spider-Man's Identity Was Revealed
Check out all the times Spider-Man's cover was totally blown!

From: www.cbr.com

Tapper: Excluding the press is un-American

Added: 24.02.2017 23:00 | 0 views | 0 comments

CNN's Jake Tapper discusses how CNN and other news outlets were blocked from an off-camera White House press briefing, raising alarm among media organizations and First Amendment watchdogs.

CNN, NY Times, LA Times and Politico barred from WH news briefing

Added: 24.02.2017 22:03 | 0 views | 0 comments

CNN and other news organizations were blocked Friday from a White House press briefing.

From: money.cnn.com

Heart risks in middle age boost dementia risk later in life

Added: 24.02.2017 21:16 | 1 views | 0 comments

Heart disease risk factors in middle age were associated with an increased risk of dementia in later years. Smoking, high blood pressure and diabetes were all dementia risks, with diabetes in middle age raising the risk almost as much as a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. Some risk factors had a different impact in black and white participants, while genetics and smoking had a greater impact in whites.

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